Rottle Size Chart, Growth Patterns & Growth Calculator

In this article, we’re going to discuss everything you should know about the size and growth stages of Rottle puppies. You’ll also get to try our interactive Rottle size chart and puppy growth calculator. Let’s dig in!

Meet the Rottweiler and Poodle mix – Rottle, Rottie-Poo, Rottiedoodle, Rottipoo. They’re goofy, playful, and highly intelligent. Not to mention, they do amazingly well with families and have endless amounts of love to share with their humans.

Sounds like an ideal dog, am I right?! Nevertheless, before you bring your new pup home, you should probably do some research and homework, so you can be fully prepared for a new furry member joining your family.

If you’ve been toying with the idea of adopting a baby Rottle, you probably have wondered, what to expect when they’re all grown up? Luckily, you’ve come to the right place, as we’re going to get to the bottom of this. 

Rottle Size Predictions: How Big Do Rottles Get?

Naturally, as we are talking about a hybrid breed combining two purebred dogs, there aren’t specific breed standards set. Of course, this also means that there’s less predictability of a puppy’s size, as they might take after either of the parent pups.

Leading us to our first and most important point. Although there’s always unpredictability involved with hybrid breeds, we can narrow the estimates down by looking at a puppy’s parents. 

Rottweilers are large dogs who can weigh anywhere between 80 to 135 pounds, and stand at 22 to 25 inches tall at the shoulder. Typically, females run a bit smaller than males, weighing about 80 to 100 pounds. Male Rottweilers tend to be larger, weighing around 95 to 135 pounds. 

On the other hand, Poodles come in three sizes – Toy, Mini, and Standard Poodle. Toy Poodles are the smallest of the bunch, weighing only around 4 to 12 pounds. Mini Poodles usually weigh about 10 to 20 pounds and stand at 10 to 15 inches tall at the shoulder. 

Last, but not least, the Standard Poodle is the largest of them all, weighing around 38 to 70 pounds, with a height of 24 to 27 inches. And as the Rottweiler is a large breed dog, they are usually mixed with Standard Poodles for optimal health and wellbeing. 

So how big does a Rottle get? Typically, a Rottle’s full-grown size is largely predictable based on the size of their parents and grandparents. So, we can expect a full-grown Rottle to weigh around 55 to 100 pounds, and stand at 20 to 25 inches tall at the shoulder. 

Rottle puppies should be fed dog food specially formulated for growing puppies. Be sure to check out our Doodle feeding guide, so you can support your puppy’s growth and development.

F1 Vs F1b Vs F2b Rottle

When it comes to hybrid breeds, it’s important we keep in mind the different generations and how they can affect a puppy’s full-grown size. Let’s have a look at the Rottle generations and what each of them means:

1st Parent2nd Parent% Rottweiler*% Poodle*
F1 Rottle (first-generation)RottweilerPoodle50%50%
F1B Rottle (first-generation backcross)F1 RottlePoodle25%75%
F1BB Rottle (first-generation backcross backcross)F1B RottlePoodle12.5%87.5%
F2 Rottle (second-generation)F1 RottleF1 Rottle50%50%
F2B Rottle (second-generation backcross)F1 RottleF1B Rottle37.5%62.5%
F2B Rottle (alternate cross)F2 RottlePoodle25%75%
F3 / Multigen RottleF1B Rottle or higherF1B Rottle or higherVariesVaries
*These are generic calculations only – genetics are rarely mathematically accurate.
  • An F1 or first-generation Rottle has a Rottweiler parent and a Poodle parent. (50% Rottweiler, 50% Poodle)
  • An F1b or first-generation backcross Rottle has a Rottle parent and an original breed parent – usually a Poodle. (25% Rottweiler, 75% Poodle)
  • An F1bb is a first-generation backcross backcross Rottle that has an F1b Rottle parent and a Poodle parent (12.5% Rottweiler, 87.5% Poodle) 
  • An F2 Rottle has two F1 Rottle parents. (50% Rottweiler, 50% Poodle)
  • An F2b Rottle has an F2 Rottle parent and a Poodle parent. (25% Rottweiler, 75% Poodle)
  • An F2bb Rottle has an F2 Rottle parent and a Poodle parent. (12.5% Rottweiler, 87.5% Poodle) 
  • An F3 Rottle or third-generation Rottle is a hybrid of different Rottles.
Doodle Generations explained

Looking at the different generations, we can learn that there’s a possibility to introduce more predictability and control over a puppy’s adult size. For instance, if the goal is to produce a smaller sized Rottle, a Mini Poodle can be introduced into F1b, F1bb, and F2 Rottle mixes. 

Rottle Size Charts & Growth Patterns

Even though all dogs are unique and will experience their growth in a slightly different manner, there are some observed growth patterns that give us a pretty good understanding of what to expect. 

Most dogs experience the fastest growth spurts in their first 6 months of life. By that time, they’ve usually reached half their adult weight, and most of their full height. Usually, around their first birthday, Rottles will have reached their full height. However, they can still continue to gain some weight and girth over the upcoming months.

We’ve created an interactive Rottle size chart and puppy growth calculator, which is a convenient tool for estimating your pup’s full-grown size! Just enter your Doodle’s type, predicted adult weight in pounds, current weight, and current age in weeks. And you’re all set!

Here’s a typical Rottle size chart for Mini and Standard Rottles:

Mini RottleStandard Rottle
Weight30-55 pounds55-100 pounds
Height15-20 inches20-27 inches
When Full-Grown?11-13 months12.5-18 months
*A dog’s height is measured from their withers, which is the highest part of their shoulder blades.

As we can see from the Rottle size chart above, Standard Rottles tend to grow up a bit slower than Mini Rottles. If you’ve adopted a Standard Rottle, you can expect them to reach half their adult weight around the time they’re 6 months old. They will then reach their adult weight between 12.5 to 18 months of age.

If you’d like to calculate your Standard Rottle’s full-grown size, you can use this formula:

On the other hand, Mini Rottles usually reach half their adult weight around the time they’re 3.5 to 5 months old. Between 11 and 13 months of age, you can expect your Mini Rottle to reach their full-grown adult weight. 

For Mini Rottles, this formula would be more accurate to predict their full-grown size:

If you suspect that your Rottle will reach over 90 pounds, then you can use this formula:

Adult Weight = Weight at 28 Weeks Old x 2

How Big Do Rottles Get?

Rottles are medium to large sized hybrid dogs, who typically weigh around 50 to 100 pounds. They stand at around 20-25 inches tall at the shoulder. Additionally, Mini Rottles are smaller, and usually weigh around 30 to 45 pounds. 

If you’ve already adopted a Rottle puppy, make sure to try our interactive Rottle size chart and puppy growth calculator to predict and track your pup’s adult size!

You can also use this formula to calculate your Rottle’s full-grown size:

We hope you’ve found our Rottle size guide a useful resource in making an educated decision about whether or not this adorable Doodle pup could thrive well in your family. Also, make sure to try our interactive Rottle size chart and puppy growth calculator, which is a handy tool for tracking your puppy’s growth.

Parents of Rottles: How big is your Rottie-Poo? Let us know in the comment section below!

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The information on this page is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian or other qualified animal health provider with any questions you may have.

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