Shihpoo Size Chart for Small and Standard Shihpoos

Here we will take a look at typical height and weight information to address the crucial question ‘how big does a Shihpoo get?’ to help you decide whether or not to adopt one. And if one of these little dogs has already melted your heart and wormed its way into your home, keep scrolling to discover some handy tools for guesstimating a puppy Shihpoo size potential.

Now, suppose the reason you are seeking out a smaller pooch is because of space limitations. In that case, you may be wondering whether these ‘small dogs’ really are small and what exactly ‘small’ means anyhow in the world of dogs.

The Different Types of Shihpoos

If you’re looking for a small dog with plenty of personality, then you might consider the Shihpoo. Also known as Shi-Poos and Shoodles, these new but increasingly popular ‘teddy-bear’ dogs are a cute and cuddly combination of the loyal and adorable Shih Tzu and the intelligent and sophisticated Poodle. 

Confident, playful, and affectionate, Shihpoos have all the looks and the character of perfect little lapdogs. Falling somewhere between the toy and small breed standards, these teeny pups just love to be pampered and cosseted. They will thrive in a household where they receive plenty of love and attention. 

Beyond that, Shihpoos are quite adaptable dogs. They have a moderate energy level and can quite happily fit in with their owner’s exercise habits. For this reason, Shihpoos do well in active and sedentary homes alike. However, be warned, Shih Tzus are known to have a bit of a stubborn streak that your dog could very well inherit. 

When it comes to size, variations in how the Shihpoo was bred could impact their final size. Perhaps the most significant of these is the type of Poodle used. As you likely know, Poodles come in three sizes: Toy, Miniature, and Standard. However, the latter is much too big to be bred naturally with Shih Tzus, so the parent will either be the smaller Toy or the slightly larger Miniature. 

As a relatively new Doodle type, most Shihpoos are first-generation – their parent dogs are Shih Tzu and Poodle. However, as the world catches on to these sweet, little canines, there will likely be further variations of these dogs as shown below:

1st Parent2nd Parent% Shih Tzu*% Poodle*
F1 Shihpoo (first-generation)Shih TzuPoodle50%50%
F1B Shihpoo (first-generation backcross)F1 ShihpooPoodle25%75%
F1BB Shihpoo (first-generation backcross backcross)F1B ShihpooPoodle12.5%87.5%
F2 Shihpoo (second-generation)F1 ShihpooF1 Shihpoo50%50%
F2B Shihpoo (second-generation backcross)F1 ShihpooF1B Shihpoo37.5%62.5%
F2B Shihpoo (alternate cross)F2 ShihpooPoodle25%75%
F3 / Multigen ShihpooF1B Shihpoo or higherF1B Shihpoo or higherVariesVaries
*These are generic calculations only – genetics are rarely mathematically accurate.
Doodle Generations explained 2022

Shihpoo Size Predictions

Understanding a dog’s potential adult size is really important for ensuring that they mesh well with your family. It’s also crucial for several other reasons, such as anticipating what they will eat and how much room they will require about the house. 

While genetics can be unpredictable, especially when it comes to newer dog breeds, the similarity in sizes of the Shih Tzu (8 to 11 inches and 9-16 pounds) and both the Toy (Less than 10 inches and 4-6 pounds) and Miniature Poodle (11 to 15 inches and 15-17 pounds) means that we can make a very reasonable prediction about your Shihpoo’s adult size.  

Shihpoo Size Charts and Growth Patterns 

These are the emerging standards for this breed: 

 Small ShihpooStandard Shihpoo
Weight5-13 pounds8-17 pounds
Height6-10 inches10-15 inches
Age at Adult Size6-10 months7-12 months
*Height is measured to the shoulder for dogs.

No matter the breed, most dogs do the most significant portion of their growing in the first six months of their lives. Smaller dogs naturally finish growing much faster than larger ones. Some Shihpoos might even have reached their adult height by this time.

Keep in mind that all pups should be on a diet specially formulated for puppies. Moreover, with Shihpoos, you should consider a formula specially designed for small breed puppies. Make sure to check out our Doodle puppy food guides.

Small Shihpoos

Small Shihpoos (the ones with the Toy Poodle parent) will likely get to half their full weight around 3-4 months and their adult weight between 6-10 months.

You can calculate their potential adult size at 15 weeks by taking what they weigh at that age and multiplying it by two.

Shihpoo size

Standard Shihpoos

Standard Shihpoos (the ones with the Miniature Poodle parent) will likely get to half their full weight around 4 – 5 months and their adult weight between 7 – 12 months.

You can calculate their potential adult size at 18 weeks by taking what they weigh at that age and multiplying it by two.

Mini-Medium Doodle Weight-Formula

A different formula you could use is:

Alternative Doodle Weight Formula

At What Age Are Shihpoos Considered Full Grown?

The age that Shihpoos are said to have reached their adult height depends on the dog’s potential size, as understood by which type of Poodle was used for breeding. Generally speaking, your dog will have reached their adult height by 12 months, although may continue to grow outwards after this for a couple of months.

Given the similar sizes of the breeds in question, calculating your Shihpoo’s adult size is a relatively straightforward process. The standards included here should give you a fair idea of what to expect. Keeping track of your puppy’s growth patterns with the help of our interactive Doodle puppy growth calculator can help to confirm what their actual final size will be.

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The information on this page is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian or other qualified animal health provider with any questions you may have.

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