How to Remove Mats From Between the Paw Pads With Clippers

As a Doodle owner, I’m sure you know all too well the risk of tangles and mats. They can occur just about anywhere, but there is one overlooked area that is especially prone to matting. And that is: between the paw pads.

In the video below, we’re going to teach you how to clip matted paw pads. Now even if your Doodle’s pads aren’t matted, you can still apply this skill to clipping overgrown paw pad hair to prevent mats from forming in the first place.

Why Paw Pads Need to Stay Mat-Free

The paws are very important to keep mat-free. This is because they can collect debris such as those pesky, pokey foxtails. These can cause a lot of discomfort which can result in limited mobility. Mats can also trap moisture, and can therefore contribute to a build-up of bacteria which could eventually lead to an infection.

As such, keeping a close eye on your Doodle’s pads is crucial if you want to help avoid infection or discomfort in any way.

Since you’re probably already adept at grooming your Doodle – whether you just do maintenance grooming between visits to the groomer or if you fully groom your Dood yourself – learning how to clip paw pads is just another one of those skills that will greatly benefit the both of you.

Admittedly, I had never done this before. I guess the idea of using clippers between her pads seemed intimidating. In fact, I used to use scissors to carefully and painstakingly snip mats out from between her pads.

Using scissors between the paw pads is a huge no-no as they pose a huge risk for injury.

Luckily, I have never once injured Chloe while using scissors.

However, as you’ll see in the video, using the clipper was stupid easy, much safer, and super FAST at removing Chloe’s paw pad mats. I really wish I had learned this skill sooner.

How to Clip Mats Out of the Paws

YouTube video

In the video above, you can see how Chloe’s pad hair is terribly overgrown and matted. (Unfortunately, it wasn’t something I noticed until I gave her her most recent summer cut.)

See Also:

(Click the image)

To begin, you will need your clipper and a short blade. Professional groomers will use a #30 blade, so you can use that if you have it. The #10 blade can also be used, though it won’t clip as short as the #30. The difference is negligible, anyway.

Andis Ultra Edge professional grade pet clipper blade

Chances are, your pup doesn’t like his feet being touched, so just work with him to find a comfortable position that provides easy access and visibility to the paw.

If you don’t have a grooming table, you might be able to sit down on the ground and have him lay on your lap. If you do have a grooming table, prop him up there and bend his paw back so it faces upward.

Get a good grasp of your dog’s paw and use your fingers to open up the pads. Doing this will allow you to see any problem areas.

If you have a multi-speed clipper, start with the lowest setting and see if that is effective at removing the hair and matting. If not, turn it up a notch.

See Also:

(Click the image)

Keep the pads pried open with your fingers and use the corner of the blade to begin chiseling the mat out. You will probably have to clip at different angles to loosen the mat.

Keep chiseling away at the mat until eventually it just pops right out. It will usually come out in one big piece, like the one in the video.

Lastly, you can tidy up any other overgrown paw hair with the clippers.


I feel pretty bad about letting Chloe’s pads get this bad, so let this be a lesson to YOU to avoid this level of paw matting on your Doodle. When we know better, we do better, right?

So there you have it!

Let us know in the comments if you’re seasoned at clipping matted paw pads and what other tricks there might be.

Also, since matting is a huge issue in Doodles, be sure to check out our Ultimate Guide to Dealing With Matted Doodle Hair.

Learn How to Groom Your Doodle At Home!

For DIY-minded Doodle parents who want to learn how to groom their pups in the comfort of their own home. Learn More

The information on this page is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional groomer advice. Always seek the advice of your groomer, veterinarian, or other qualified animal health provider with any questions you may have.

Pin It!