Shih Poo Price Overview of Pricing Factors & Ongoing Costs

The adorable, amazing, and endearing Shih Poo has quickly become a fan favorite amongst Doodle lovers. And we can definitely understand why! If you’ve decided to expand your family with this cute little Dood, you probably want to know all about the Shih Poo price in terms of adoption and ongoing living costs. In this guide, we discuss exactly that and much more. 

Shih Poo Price: How Much Does A Shih Poo Cost?

The Shih Poo is a hybrid cross between the Shih Tzu and Poodle. Shih Tzus are well-known for their regal looks and loving nature. On the other hand, we have the wildly intelligent Poodle that anyone will recognize by its distinctive curly hair and elaborate hairdos.

By combining these two purebred dogs, we get the sweetest little Shih Poo that’s equally as affectionate, smart, and cute as its parents. And let’s not forget, they come with low-shedding coats, just like the hypoallergenic Poodle parent. 

Thanks to their small size, these pups can fit perfectly into a city apartment or a spacious house, regardless if you’re a single, couple, or a family. They’re literally the perfect lap dogs. They absolutely thrive in human company, provided that they get plenty of kisses, cuddles, and attention throughout the day. 

So, if you’ve decided that the Shih Poo is the right pup for you, you’ve probably ended up here to find out how much Shih Poos cost to adopt. In the US, you can expect to pay between $1200 and $4000 for a puppy.

But apart from the initial Shih Poo cost of adoption, you’ll also want to factor in the ongoing costs of owning a dog, such as their food, vet visits, regular grooming, training, and their daily supplies like food and water bowls, dog beds, and so on. We’ll cover this a bit later on in this article. First, let’s take a closer look at the key factors that determine the Shih Poo price.

Factors That Determine Shih Poo Price

Genetic Guarantees

As we have learned, adopting a Shih Poo does not come cheap. But, there’s a reason why the Shih Poo price is so high. Most notably, because of genetic guarantees and health screening. 

Ethical breeders only use health and DNA tested parents in their breeding programs. By health screening the parents for a wide variety of hereditary illnesses and conditions, breeders can confidently produce healthy litters from strong bloodlines. Of course, all of this costs a lot of money.

Additionally, these breeders send their puppies home with genetic health guarantees for the first one or two years. Some breeders even offer health warranties for up to five years. 

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Location

Your geographical location can also influence the Shih Poo price in the area. Most commonly, breeders charge more in highly populated areas, where the overall cost of living is also higher. When comparing the Shih Poo cost of adoption in different states, the average price can vary by hundreds, even thousands of dollars. 

If you do find that reputable breeders in neighboring states sell their puppies at much lower price points, adopting your new Dood out of state could very well pay off. However, you’ll also want to take into account all the additional expenses on travel, such as gas or airfares, and flight nanny services.

Breeder Stock

Breeding stock will obviously affect how much you’ll have to pay for a Shih Poo puppy. As we previously learned, it’s crucial that breeders use extensively health tested parents in their programs to ensure optimal health in their litters. 

Putting together a breeding program can also require more investments based on what generation the breeder specializes to produce. Like other hybrid breeds, Shih Poos can be either first-generation, second-generation, first-generation backcross, second-generation backcross, and so on.

Doodle Generations explained 2022

Some breeders, for example, charge less for first-generation pups with purebred Shih Tzu and Poodle parents. Meanwhile, later generations that require at least one Shih Poo parent can sometimes be slightly more expensive. 

Today, Shih Poos are most commonly bred as first-generation. But, we can expect to see more variations of this Dood in the future, just like with more established Poodle mixes like the Goldendoodle and Labradoodle. 

Demand

The demand in certain locations or areas can also drive up the Shih Poo price. And as you would expect, in-demand breeders often charge more for their puppies as well. 

Ethical breeders with established programs have long waiting lists that are filled months, sometimes even years in advance. And as we discussed earlier, responsible breeders have invested a lot of money, and continuously do so, on health and genetic testing, the puppies’ and mamas’ diets, daily care, and veterinary care. All of this will naturally reflect in the Shih Poo price. 

Size & Coat Type

Although it doesn’t apply to all, it’s not uncommon for some breeders to charge more for different Shih Poo sizes and coat types. For example, you might have to pay extra for a Small Shih Poo puppy that has a Toy Poodle parent. Some breeders also charge more for Shih Poos with Poodle-inspired, low-shedding curly coats.

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Breeder Reputation

Obviously, a breeder’s reputation will most definitely affect the Shih Poo price. As we mentioned earlier, reputable breeders are extremely in demand and can therefore charge more money as well. Not only do they focus on health, they also have extensive knowledge on all things related to raising happy, healthy, and well-rounded puppies, such as training, socialization, and daily care.

Moreover, many of the more well-known, reputable Shih Poo breeders are also affiliated with organizations that are committed to responsible breeding. These include the American Kennel Club (AKC), Continental Kennel Club (CKC), or the Good Dog’s Responsible Breeding Program. 

How The Shih Poo Price Varies Between Different Types Of Breeders

By this point, you’ve probably noticed how many times we’ve emphasized the importance of choosing an ethical Shih Poo breeder that follows responsible breeding guidelines. Although yes, their prices can seem somewhat high, you’ll know that you’ll get a healthy puppy that’s been well taken care of. 

So, to explain this topic a bit further, we’re going to take a look at the different types of breeders, their breeding practices, and how their prices vary. 

Professional Shih Poo Breeders

For anyone planning to adopt a Shih Poo puppy from a breeder, it’s crucial to opt for a professional, reputable breeder that has extensive knowledge and experience. Understandably, these breeders also charge more for their puppies. The average Shih Poo price starts from $1200 and can go up to $4000.  

There are also many hobby breeders that follow responsible breeding guidelines and health testing standards. Their programs are quite small and they only have a litter or two a year. Nonetheless, they’re still very much focused on the health and wellbeing of their parents and puppies. 

Responsible breeders only use health tested parents, provide genetic health guarantees, keep their dogs and puppies in a safe and loving home environment, feed them a healthy diet, train them, socialize them, and spoil them from birth until adoption. All of which requires the breeder’s full attention and dedication. 

What’s more, many responsible Shih Poo breeders are also affiliated with various organizations. They also work closely with mentors and other ethical dog breeders to share knowledge and best practices. Needless to say, responsible breeders are also extremely transparent about their program and processes, and have no problem answering any questions you might have. 

Backyard Breeders

You might also come across backyard breeders that produce Shih Poo puppies. Oftentimes, these breeders are motivated to bring more adorable Shih Poos into this world for loving owners to adopt. However, they usually lack the education on health testing protocols, puppy rearing methods, training, dietary requirements, and so on. 

You also won’t be able to get a genetic health guarantee, or any guarantee for that matter about the puppies’ health and wellbeing. They usually don’t provide any contracts or documentation, and the whole process is quite informal.  

How much do Shih Poos cost when adopting a puppy from a backyard breeder? As you might’ve guessed, these breeders usually charge less than professional breeders. Simply because they haven’t invested that much money in their programs, and because they may not operate as legal businesses with guarantees and warranties.

In addition to that, their lower prices also give them the opportunity to compete with professional breeders, because there are always people wanting to adopt a new puppy for a fraction of the price. 

Puppy Mills

On the lowest tier of breeders we have puppy mills. These breeding facilities keep their costs as low as possible, while constantly breeding new litters to sell to more customers. As they are only motivated by their own financial gain, their parent dogs are kept on tight breeding schedules, resulting in serious health issues for the mamas. They usually keep their dogs and puppies in cages, in horrible conditions, often malnourished and completely neglected. 

Unfortunately, there are many people who simply aren’t educated on how to choose a breeder – the exact target market for puppy mills. Since these breeding facilities sell their puppies for very low prices compared to professional breeders, they also have plenty of customers to cater to. But remember, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. 

Although the initial cost of adoption is very low, you’ll likely notice problems soon after adoption. It’s not uncommon for puppies from puppy mills to come with serious health problems, chronic illnesses, or behavioral issues.

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Costs of Shih Poo Ownership

One of the biggest expenses will obviously be the initial Shih Poo price when you adopt your new puppy. But as with any living being, it’ll also cost you money to take care of your new canine friend for the next 10 to 15 years, at least. There will be one-time expenses on your puppy’s everyday items and supplies, but also monthly and yearly costs any dog owner should budget for.

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Food

An ongoing expense that you’ll spend a lot of money on throughout your dog’s lifetime is their food. But when picking out a kibble for your Dood, opt for high quality formulas that are recommended by other dog owners and veterinarians

Feeding your pup a healthy, balanced, and nutritious diet is the single most effective thing you can do to support their health and promote longevity. Look for dog food formulas that are made with real ingredients and fortified with vitamins, minerals, and supplements.

Since the Shih Poo is such a small dog, their eating habits likely won’t be breaking the bank. A good quality dry kibble can cost you anywhere between $30 and $50 on a monthly basis. And even though these dog food formulas may be slightly more expensive, they’re made with real, healthy ingredients without any unnecessary additives or fillers that can trigger allergies or food intolerances.

Training

An important part in raising a Shih Poo puppy into a well-behaved and confident adult is training. Usually, responsible breeders already start with early socialization, potty training, crate training, and obedience training, all of which you’ll have to continue at home to enforce good manners and habits. 

Since Shih Poos are known to have a stubborn streak from time to time, it’s completely normal if you’d like to get some guidance from a professional dog trainer. One option is to pay around $50 to $100 for dog training classes or a professional dog trainer. You can also subscribe for a lifetime access to the Online Puppy School by Baxter & Bella, which conveniently covers all of these important topics online. 

Vet Visits

The dreaded expense of veterinary care can put many people off from adopting a pet. You’ll have to budget for yearly vet checkups and be prepared for unexpected vet visits in case any accidents or sudden illnesses happen. A good pet insurance plan will definitely give you some peace of mind. 

Additionally, you’ll have to take your new puppy to the vet more than once during their first year at home. There will be appointments for vaccinations and preventative care for worms and fleas. Some time around the 6 month mark you’ll have to consult with your vet about a spay or neuter surgery. All of this can cost you about $1000 to $2000 in that first year.

Grooming

The downside of having a hypoallergenic coat is that it requires regular upkeep. Firstly, any Shih Poo owner should purchase a good quality slicker or pin brush, a sturdy comb, and a nail clipper – your most used grooming tools at home. You’ll also have to budget for their haircuts every 4 to 8 weeks. A professional dog groomer will charge you between $50 and $100 each time.

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A great way to save a substantial amount of money is by grooming your Shih Poo at home. With a little bit of guidance, practice, and great quality grooming tools, you’ll soon become a total pro at it. It’s also a great way to form a stronger bond with your dog!

Time Investment

It goes without saying that dogs are living, social beings that need your time, affection, and attention. Before adopting a Shih Poo, really consider whether you have enough time for walkies, playtime, and training each day with your dog, especially during those very first months after your puppy gets home. A new puppy is essentially still a baby that needs your constant care and supervision. It can be demanding at times, but so worth it!

Other Costs

And finally, there will be all of those initial purchases of daily supplies, such as food and water bowls, a leash and collar, dog beds, a crate, toys, treats, and poop bags, which can cost you a few hundred dollars altogether. 

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In terms of ongoing costs, there may be times when you have to hire a dog walker or a pet sitter. For example, when you’re going away on holiday and can’t take your dog with you.

Where Can You Buy A Shih Poo Puppy?

If you’ve decided to adopt a Shih Poo puppy, you’re likely wondering – how to find quality Shih Poo breeders? As fellow Doodle owners, we know that it’s not the easiest of tasks. 

So, to help you get started on this journey, we decided to create our Shih Poo Breeders Directory, where we list ethical breeders that follow responsible breeding guidelines.

Shih Poo Price: FAQ

Are Shihpoo Dogs Good?

Shih Poos are loving, playful, friendly, and smart little companions. They make excellent pets for almost any household, as long as you have the time and energy to spoil this pup. Thanks to their small size, they’re suitable for both apartment-dwellers and people living in big houses. At the end of the day, the Shih Poo loves nothing more than to cuddle up with its favorite humans. The Shih Tzu-Poodle mix truly is the epitome of a lap dog.

How Much Is A Shih Tzu Poo?

The average Shih Poo price ranges between $1200 and $4000 when adopting a puppy from a reputable breeder in the US. Of course, the Shih Poo cost varies between different states. As with anything, their price is usually tied to the overall cost of living in the area. 

Shih Poo Price: Final Thoughts

There’s nothing better than having a cuddly companion by your side at all times. But with pet ownership there are also plenty of responsibilities you’ll carefully have to consider before taking on this huge commitment. One of the most important aspects of it being the financial side of things. We hope you’ve found this article a helpful resource for understanding the Shih Poo price of adoption and overall living costs.

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The information on this page is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for qualified professional veterinary advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your veterinarian or other qualified animal health provider with any questions you may have.

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